MET school to adjust bus zones, but say demountables comply

BLOCKED IN: Robert Farrell and Debbie McInnes experience gridlock outside their homes at peak school drop-off and pick-up times. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0905jkmet6
BLOCKED IN: Robert Farrell and Debbie McInnes experience gridlock outside their homes at peak school drop-off and pick-up times. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0905jkmet6

ORANGE MET School will adjust its bus zones on Bletchington Street after residents complained of several buses parking across their driveways. 

Debbie McInnes lives two doors down from the school and said she sometimes could not exit her driveway. 

“There’s been times when I have not been able to get out,” she said.

“Even if they don’t park across the driveway, they’re so wide that you’ve literally got to back right back to the other side of the road to see.”

She believed the bus zone could be extended for the length of the school’s property to avoid affecting neighbours.

Fellow neighbour, Robert Farrell, said he had seen the minibuses double parked at times. 

“Plus all the school teachers’ cars are parked along the street,” he said. 

The school’s head of campus, David Scott, said the school was discussing an extension to the bus parking zone in Bletchington Street with the council and NSW Roads and Maritime Services, in response to discussions with a neighbour on Monday.

“This will alleviate the parking of buses in front of neighbouring homes,” he said.

“To further reduce on-street parking, additional parking is being made available on the school grounds for staff and parents.”

Residents also complained about the appearance of two demountable classroom buildings constructed across the street frontage, labelling them as shabby. 

Mr Farrell contended the most recent addition, which began construction two months ago, did not reflect the plans he had seen and a larger fence was never constructed, meaning balls in his yard on a regular basis. 

“They were quite alright [on the plans] – they looked as though they had louvres all around them to look nice, but they don’t look like that at all,” he said.

“They have to do something to improve the look of them.”

However, state government legislation allows schools to construct demountables without council consent as exempt development.

Mr Scott confirmed the MET School’s buildings met all legislative requirements, with the latest building expected to be completed in the coming weeks.

However, Mr Scott said the school respected its neighbours and would reach out to discuss and work to resolve concerns. 

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