Sex coach to lead classes in town as shop seeks to break down perceptions

HAPPY HENS PARTY: Hayley Barker, Chloe Thompson, Gemma Wright and Bec McLean were shopping for party supplies at the Flirt Adult Store. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0111jkflirt1
HAPPY HENS PARTY: Hayley Barker, Chloe Thompson, Gemma Wright and Bec McLean were shopping for party supplies at the Flirt Adult Store. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0111jkflirt1

Sex education for adults is to be offered in Orange as part of efforts by an adult store to break down perceptions about its business.

Flirt Adult Store moved to new premises on Summer Street in October amid opposition from some nearby shops.

However, manager Jules Pearce, said it was a far cry from old-fashioned sex shops.

It’s not dark nor seedy but light and fun.

Jules Pearce, Flirt adult store

“Many people tend to shy away when an adult shop is mentioned but we are an adult store that tastefully brings adult products to the over 18 community,” she said.

Part of that bid to promote the shop to Orange residents will include the introduction of monthly adult sex education classes to be run on site by a Sydney sex coach, known as MisJif.

“It is not dark nor seedy but light and fun,” she said.

The classes for about 20 people, couples and singles, will cost $30 per person.

“It’s a bit of fun and educational,” she said.

“There will be one a month with a different topic each month.

“We saw the need from people coming in and asking questions.”

Mrs Pearce said a glass of champagne and snacks would be served at the classes and included in the price.

REACHING OUT: Jules Pearce, the Flirt Adult Shop manager. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0111jkflirt2

REACHING OUT: Jules Pearce, the Flirt Adult Shop manager. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0111jkflirt2

She said the shop was appealing to a wide range of the community as well as helping out people with medical needs.

“Our stores promote sexual health and well being,” she said.

“I would say probably most people would be 35 and up.

“There’s a good mix of men and women.

“We also help people and have many medical professionals who direct their patients to our store for devices to help them after illness and treatment.”

Mrs Pearce said she was comfortable with telling people where she worked.

“I’m fine with it,” she said.

“Some people say ‘Oh God, you must see some weird people.’

“It’s broadening people’s views, it’s not embarrassing to be part of it.”

She said a lot of customers were looking for novelties and items for parties.

A group of women were shopping with bride-to-be Chloe Thompson for her hen’s party when the Central Western Daily visited the shop.

Ms Thompson said she was not offended by the store displays.

“I just think that it’s funny, I don’t think that it is gross,” she said.