Scotland brave to break away: Orange's Scots following referendum closely

INDEPENDENCE A LONG SHOT: Gordon Muir says it’s ridiculous to think Scotland can go it alone. Photo: STEVE GOSCH

INDEPENDENCE A LONG SHOT: Gordon Muir says it’s ridiculous to think Scotland can go it alone. Photo: STEVE GOSCH

THEY may be a long way from their country of birth, but three Scottish-born Orange residents are closely following the developments as Scotland edges closer to a referendum vote on September 18 to split with Britain.

Gordon Muir, who came to Australia 30 years ago and is returning to Scotland in a few months to visit family and friends, is adamant Scotland can’t go it alone.

“It’s ridiculous to think they can break away - they just don’t have the money or the resources,” he said.

“Can you imagine how much it would cost them to raise their own army for instance?

“It will be bizarre when I go back if the yes vote gets up.”

With a free system of university education for all in Scotland, Mr Muir says that will come to an end if the yes vote prevails.

“They will have to find new ways to fund all the infrastructure and systems they need to put in place, so in the end I don’t think it will get up,” he said.

GREAT SCOTS: Scottish citizens Fiona Williamson and Greg Fenwick will lodge their vote online in the upcoming Scottish independence referendum.  Photo: STEVE GOSCH                               0819scot3

GREAT SCOTS: Scottish citizens Fiona Williamson and Greg Fenwick will lodge their vote online in the upcoming Scottish independence referendum. Photo: STEVE GOSCH 0819scot3

Fellow Scots Greg Fenwick and Fiona Williamson, who both work at the Byng Street Cafe and Local Store, have talked about the issue and have something in common.

“We both have mothers who are nurses and the issue of the future of the NHS [National Health Scheme] is a concern for them,” Mr Fenwick said.

“But I am definitely voting no - I think we all work better in the UK as a team.”

Ms Williamson said her mother was concerned over talk of changes to the NHS and how it would affect the way healthcare was delivered in the United Kingdom.

“Originally I thought we were better to stick together as a small country and I know my family want to vote yes,” she said.

“I have been wavering in my decision but probably I’m edging more towards a no vote now.”

Ms Williamson likes to be introduced as a Scot. 

But Mr Fenwick likes the bigger picture.

“I prefer to be called British,” he said.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop