Charles Sturt University passes the test as results improve

UNDER PRESSURE: Kelso High year 12 students Georgina Meyers and Jodie Simson are studying hard for the Higher School Certificate. 
Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 071514careers

UNDER PRESSURE: Kelso High year 12 students Georgina Meyers and Jodie Simson are studying hard for the Higher School Certificate. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 071514careers

CHARLES Sturt University (CSU) is among only two universities in Australia where students have improved on their pass rates compared with a decade ago.

In 2003, 77.88 per cent of CSU students passed all of their subjects, but in 2013 this figure jumped to 83.58 per cent, just above the average national score of 83.52 per cent.

The only other university to improve on their decade-old score was the University of New South Wales, up from 90.09 per cent in 2003 to 91.44 last year.

CSU deputy vice-chancellor Garry Marchant said he was proud of the university's growth in pass rates for their 16,000 on-campus students.

“We try to engage with students more and provide mentoring and we’ve got a risk assessment to predict when students might have problems,” he said.

“We’re proud of trying to help as many people be as successful as possible."

While good results are important, Kelso High School careers counsellor Denis Behan said one failed university subject over a 12 month period was really not that “dire”.

Mr Behan said not all students were suited, or wanted to go, to university, and the school made sure students were aware of the wide range of options available.

“We look at apprenticeships and traineeships and also university,” he said.

“We have things like work experience and a job expo and a number of events in and out of school.

“We have employers, TAFE, private colleges, universities, you name it ... we present all options to all students because at the end of the day the kids will change careers over their lifetime.”

Getting a great score is already foremost in the minds of year 12 Kelso High School students Jodie Simson and Georgina Meyers.

“Teachers make out to us that your ATAR and HSC is everything,” Jodie said.

“I don’t think we’re under pressure to go to uni, but there’s a lot of pressure to get a good ATAR.”

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