POLL: We felt safer in Mount Druitt: South Terrace residents have had enough

TROUBLE TOWN: Residents in South Terrace say antisocial behaviour in the area has left them desperate to sell up and move to a different city. Photo: STEVE GOSCH.

TROUBLE TOWN: Residents in South Terrace say antisocial behaviour in the area has left them desperate to sell up and move to a different city. Photo: STEVE GOSCH.

BRAWLING in the streets and excessive drug and alcohol use are commonplace in South Terrace, according to two residents who say they felt safer living in Sydney’s troubled Mount Druitt than they do in Glenroi.

The couple, who asked not to be named, say they have had enough of the antisocial behaviour in the area after the latest outbreak of violence left two  people hospitalised.

According to the couple, a fight broke out in South Terrace around 2.40pm on Saturday when a large group of people began yelling abuse and punching each while standing in the middle of the street.

While police were quick to intervene on that occasion, the residents expect the antisocial behaviour to continue on an almost-daily basis, leaving them and their children fearing for their own safety.

They say its time police looked at setting up a mobile police station in the area and increased their patrols.

“There are a lot of good people in Glenroi but a lot of them are just too afraid to say anything about what’s happening,” the woman said.

“Even in Mount Druit and Merrylands I’ve never seen this kind of mentality where violence is accepted.”

The couple understand police have a hard time catching those responsible for the violence and vandalism, so this week they installed a CCTV camera at the front of their house.

OUR SAY: THE TIME TO STRIKE AGAINST CRIME IS NOW

They hope to provide police with footage of the next altercation that occurs outside their property.

“By the time the police come there’s often no one there.We hope we can help them identify those people who are involved,” the woman said.

She said often parents were so drug and alcohol affected they were unable to adequately supervise their children.

“There can be adults standing and watching children fight and they’ll encourage them to keep going or they’ll act like it’s not their problem,” the woman said.

“I’d like to see people accountable for their actions.”

She said troublemakers did not come from any one background and it was not uncommon to see Sudanese people, indigenous Australians and Caucasians all fighting each other.

The couple say they are very house proud, having purchased their property from Housing NSW two years ago, but would jump at the opportunity to leave Orange.

However, when they purchased their house the contract stipulated that they must live there for at least another five years.

“We’ll sell the house when we can. We won’t be staying in Orange and I wouldn’t recommend the people in this town. There’s a lot of racism, violence and problems with alcohol,” she said.

tracey.prisk@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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