Acclaim for Lyndon Community drug and alcohol rehabilitation methods

CHANGING LIVES: NSW Mental Health Commissioner John Feneley presents deputy chief executive officer of Lyndon Community Doctor Julaine Allan with an award recognising the organisation’s contribution to reducing drug and alcohol related harm.

CHANGING LIVES: NSW Mental Health Commissioner John Feneley presents deputy chief executive officer of Lyndon Community Doctor Julaine Allan with an award recognising the organisation’s contribution to reducing drug and alcohol related harm.

THE Lyndon Community has been recognised by one of the state’s peak bodies by winning the inaugural excellence in research and evaluation award.

The award was presented to deputy chief executive officer of The Lyndon Community Doctor Julaine Allan recently at a ceremony in Sydney by NSW Mental Health Commissioner John Feneley.

Lyndon has taken out the inaugural award established this year to acknowledge the significant contribution of the non-government drug and alcohol sector in reducing drug- and alcohol-related harm in NSW communities through leadership, program design and delivery and a dedicated workforce.

Doctor Allan said she was delighted Lyndon has been recognised for its contribution to building the evidence base for practices to reduce drug and alcohol related harm.

She said the Lyndon research and training program has led to 13 articles being published in scientific journals since the program began in 2008 in addition to being presented at numerous conferences.

Lyndon is one of more than 50 drug and alcohol specialist services that operates across New South Wales.

Doctor Allan says however securing funding for the work for Lyndon to continue is an ongoing battle.

“It is a real struggle to attract funding,” she said.

Doctor Allan said unfortunately work with people addicted to drugs and alcohol doesn’t attract the same level of interest or support for people who are battling illnesses such as cancer.

“Of course fundraising for cancer support services are very important and of course they aren’t stigmatised the way people are who have drug and alcohol challenges,” she said.

Doctor Allan said Lyndon continues to push ahead with innovations.

“We are currently developing new information technology systems to manage our clients’ records electronically and are in talks to find possible ways to fund that development,” she said.

The Lyndon Community in Orange is based out of one of the buildings on the Bloomfield campus and also has a residential facility in Canowindra.

Lyndon runs residential and non-residential programs across much of the central west.

janice.harris@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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