Schools embrace Red Shield Appeal contest as students prepare to hit the pavement

HEALTHY RIVALRY: (back) Orange High School captains Meaghan Kempson and Trent French, Orange Christian school vice-captains Annalise Barnes and Zac Pearson, Kinross Wolaroi School vice-captains Poppy Brown and Alex Amos; (front) James Sheahan Catholic High School vice-captains Thomas Fisher and Hilary Eddy and Canobolas Rural Technology High School captain Taylor Clarke and school leader Maddy Penrose will lead their schools in the battle for the participation shield. Photo: STEVE GOSCh0509sgsalvos2

HEALTHY RIVALRY: (back) Orange High School captains Meaghan Kempson and Trent French, Orange Christian school vice-captains Annalise Barnes and Zac Pearson, Kinross Wolaroi School vice-captains Poppy Brown and Alex Amos; (front) James Sheahan Catholic High School vice-captains Thomas Fisher and Hilary Eddy and Canobolas Rural Technology High School captain Taylor Clarke and school leader Maddy Penrose will lead their schools in the battle for the participation shield. Photo: STEVE GOSCh0509sgsalvos2

ON May 25, Orange schools will come together in a battle of honour and glory when they participate in the Salvation Army’s Red Shield Appeal.

Each year the school with the most students on the streets raising money for the appeal has their name etched into a perpetual trophy.

James Sheahan Catholic High School has been hot on the heels of Kinross Wolaroi School for years and the reigning title holders know they must come out in force to maintain their title.

Last year 136 Kinross students braved the cold to knock on doors in Orange for the appeal.

They accounted for 45 per cent of the 297 students participating on the day.

Kinross vice-captain Alex Amos welcomed the competition and warned Kinross was aiming for a record turn-out in 2014.

“You can’t have too many help out,” he said. 

Orange Christian School does not have enough students to come close to the Kinross foot soldiers but what they lack in numbers, they make up for in spirit.

Last year 70 per cent of their Year 12 students hit the streets for the appeal.

Orange Christian school vice-captain Annalise Barnes said as a Christian school, serving and loving the community was part of the school’s values. 

“It’s a chance to give back to the community,” she said. 

Fellow vice-captain Zac Pearson said participating in the Red Shield Appeal was a privilege. 

Orange High School captains Meaghan Kempson and Trent French said the school should not to be forgotten.

They vowed to embrace the competition and blow the other schools out of the water with school spirit and feet on the ground. 

“Orange High School is a very competitive school and I’m sure if we just mention we’re up against Kinross we’ll get plenty of volunteers,” Meaghan said. 

Zac threw everything on the table and said “whatever Kinross get - we’ll double it”. 

The total raised for the Red Shield Appeal last year was $58,957 in Orange, but in order to reach such a total this year volunteers to drive the students around are essential.

Salvation Army Red Shield Appeal business chair Tony Rodd said people would only need to donate a couple of hours on the day to sit in heated warmth in their cars to chaperone the students. 

He said without the students the appeal would not be anywhere near as successful. 

For information call Tony Rodd on 0437 990 322

nicole.kuter@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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