No foul play in central west: gay slurs not an issue on our footy fields

“REFEREES would never let it happen.”

Group 10 Rugby League president Linore Zamparini said the chances of players being sexually vilified in his competition were slim to none.

Wests Tigers Holden Cup and NSW under 20s star Mitchell Moses was found guilty of breaching the NRL’s code of conduct in last weekend’s spiteful junior State of Origin clash, having made a homophobic slur, putting anti-vilification policies under the microscope nationwide.

Mr Moses was suspended for two games, costing himself his NRL debut, after the referee’s on-field microphone picked up the halfback calling Queensland’s Luke Bateman “a f****** gay  ***”.

The outburst was heard by the live television audience.

“It’s all about education now and cleaning up the codes, from grassroots to the elite. Adam Goodes being called an ape is a good example, he was happy for the offending people to be sent away and educated"

Mr Zamparini said there had not been any homophobic incidents in his tenure and added Mr Moses’ punishment was the most important factor to come from the incident. He is required to undergo anti-vilification education and an awareness program as part of driving an inclusive sporting culture.

“A lot of things are said in the heat of the moment, but this can’t be allowed,” Mr Zamparini said.

“It’s all about education now and cleaning up the codes, from grassroots to the elite. Adam Goodes being called an ape is a good example, he was happy for the offending people to be sent away and educated. 

“In terms of Group 10, we have the Country Rugby League’s anti-racism policies in place. They cover bullying, or homophobic comments if they were to ever occur.”

THE BIG PICTURE: VILIFICATION WILL NOT BE TOLERATED

Central West Rugby Union supremo Peter Veenstra echoed Mr Zamparini’s comments.

“That has never happened in the central west and I would be very distressed if it ever was to occur,” he said

“It would be a clear breach of the code of conduct and in that situation the player would definitely be fronting a judiciary and dealt with severely.

"It would come under rule 10.4 as behaviour contrary to general sportsmanship.

"In the situation, if it ever happened, it would be the referee’s discretion as to how it was handled on the field. But I would imagine it would result in a yellow or red card.”

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop