Microchip ensures a happy tale

FOR many people the family dog or cat is very much a part of the family and when Emma Williams’ 15-week-old puppy Harley went missing she feared the worst.

Ms Williams said her young pup went wandering when she and her husband Nick had gone away for the weekend and Harley was left behind with a friend.

But thanks to a few minutes of her time and some amazing technology in a tiny microchip their story had a happy ending, but many other pets aren’t so lucky.

Veterinarian Geoff Freeth said lost animals are often brought into his surgery, and those without a microchip end up at the pound.

Mrs Williams’ said while she was away her pup went on an “exploring trip”.

“A couple found her on Sale Street and took her to the vet,” she said.

Ms Williams said she was thankful she decided to get her dog microchipped, and even more thankful the couple dropped Harley to the vet.

“They [puppies] like to explore and you can’t watch them all the time,” she said. “I was so relieved, she’s an adventurous little thing.”

Canobolas Family Pet Hospital veterinarian Geoff Freeth said while around 90 per cent of dogs are microchipped, 90 per cent of cats aren’t.

“I think cats are seen as a little more disposable,” he said.

Dr Freeth said it is law to have your cat or dog microchipped and from as little as $34 he said it is more than affordable.

In the past, he said some microchips were not listed on an official register, so recommended you check your pet’s chip on the next visit to the vet.

If your dog or cat does go missing Dr Freeth recommended you look at the pound, rather than just call.

“People look at a cat or dog and interpret it [the breed] in a different way. If they have been impounded it’s very important to go and look,” he said.

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