Doubts remain for William Maker Drive speed solution

POSITIVE START: Councillor Glenn Taylor has welcomed plans to paint double lines along William Maker Drive to slow traffic. Photo: CARLA FREEDMAN 0911cfwilliammaker7
POSITIVE START: Councillor Glenn Taylor has welcomed plans to paint double lines along William Maker Drive to slow traffic. Photo: CARLA FREEDMAN 0911cfwilliammaker7

DOUBLE line are set to be painted along William Maker Drive, but those concerned about speeding problems along the stretch have reserved their judgement until they see results.

The City of Orange Traffic Committee voted to paint the lines in response to speeding concerns raised since 2016 when councillor Glenn Taylor spotted one car travelling at 120km/h

The linemarking will create a 3.2 metre-wide lane in each direction, which the committee hoped would reduce the feeling of space on the road.

In turn, according to research from the UK, drivers would slow down.

The committee said ongoing housing development along William Maker Drive towards the Northern Distributor Road would create a more urban feel and spark a downward trend in speeds.

Speed monitoring along the road indicated 15 per cent of motorists travelled faster than 61.7km/h.

Cr Taylor said it was a move in the right direction. 

“It’s a positive start, I’m grateful the traffic committee is at least addressing the issue,” he said.

“It’s a long road and a very wide road and linemarking will give the impression of lanes, which may slow the traffic down.”

However, he said Orange City Council and the traffic committee needed to continue monitoring the road to ensure the measure worked.

He pointed to Hill Street, near Phillip Street, which encountered regular speeding drivers despite the lanes being marked and separated.

“If it doesn’t work, we have to have another look at other options,” he said.

“There are a lot of families with kids on bikes.”

While he said speed humps had been effective in Diamond Drive, he did not support the infrastructure, preferring blisters like the ones at the top end of Anson Street, near Brendon Sturgeon Oval. 

Glasson Drive resident James Caulfield, who has previously raised concerns about endemic speeding, growing traffic numbers from Telopea Way and risk-taking at the Northern Distributor Road intersection, said painted lines were not a solution.

He believed the growing housing development was only making the area more congested and dangerous. 

“It’s a pathetic and ridiculous response to it,” he said. 

“The only thing that’s going to solve it is a roundabout – someone’s going to be hurt badly and it’s going to be on their heads.”

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