STOP PRESS: Possibilities in tradition of giving names to full moons

WHAT'S IN A NAME: Overseas, full moons are given wonderfully poetic titles, like 'Harvest to Snow'. Maybe it's time to introduce the tradition to Orange?
WHAT'S IN A NAME: Overseas, full moons are given wonderfully poetic titles, like 'Harvest to Snow'. Maybe it's time to introduce the tradition to Orange?

For centuries it has been regarded as mystical and an inspiration for people like poets, artists and lovers.

There’s also legends the full moon makes people do crazy things, and even some veterinarians believe it freaks out cats and dogs.

Last Tuesday we had the largest supermoon we’ll get this year, being closest to earth since 1998.

There’ll be another full moon on January 31 with a total lunar eclipse when it’s covered by the earth's shadow, turning it red as well, and then no full moon in February.

All full moons have names in other countries ranging from ‘Strawberry to Flower’, ‘Harvest to Snow’ and ‘Blue to Pink’, but we still have none, so what about these?

The January 2 Supermoon could have been called ‘Find a Business Open in Orange’ moon, while the next on January 31 could be the ‘Great Robertson Park Dunny Debacle’ moon or ‘Will We Ever Get a Dunny’ moon.

The March 1 full moon could be ‘The New Council Honeymoon is Over’ moon, and March 31, well, you give it a name.

And any ideas for the rest of the year?

CITY REAWAKENS AS BUSINESSES OPEN AFTER BREAK

TUESDAY marked an important event in Orange: Half the city’s businesses re-opened after a 10-day Christmas-New Year shutdown.

But some are still on extended holidays and life won’t return to normal until next Monday.

People found it almost impossible to get a haircut, see a solicitor, doctor or accountant, get a dripping tap fixed or have the car serviced. Getting a coffee was even tough.

So, do we need to have this annual total shutdown or could some sort of roster be worked out so we don’t become a ghost town?

REPETITIOUS AND REPETITIOUS, SAYS TV CRITIC

It’s the non-ratings silly period so the TV stations are rolling out the repeats, junk shows and old movie re-runs.

          The cake they’re feeding us includes boring stuff from New Zilland like Border Patrol, for one, which is a big yawn with a Chinese airline pessenger fined for heving two peckets of peanuts, other food items and too minny cigarettes in his beg.

          A South Korean woman was sint beck home for being a sispected six worker

because she hed erotic photos on her phone.

          Another min from Undia was fined for heving a jar of honey, beans and plents in his beg he said was pecked by his cousin.

          Motorway Patrol is another New Zilland show thet’s about coppers chasing and cetching speeding drivers around Auckland.

          It’s hardly ruveting stuff.​

BERRY, BERRY EXPENSIVE FOR A NOXIOUS WEED

WHO doesn’t love juicy blackberries? Once we could find some bushes on the side of the road and fill a couple of buckets of the fruit that’s a source of dietary fibre, vitamins C and E and other antioxidants.

But blackberries in the wild have disappeared since being declared noxious because of the damage they did to grazing and forestry lands and sheltering rabbits and foxes.

Blackberries are now grown commercially, although they’re a bit silvery, with Aldi selling them this week for a whopping $35.92 a kilogram.

That makes them all the more expensive when you can buy porterhouse steak for $28 a kilogram, Aussie tiger prawns for $26 per kilogram or home-grown cherries at Woollies for $13.80 per kilogram.

Weren’t we lucky when we could pick our own blackberries for nix?

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