One for the money: Everything from Elvis and The Beatles to independents at record fair

VINYL REVIVAL: Orange record fair organiser Patrick Coomey is bringing live music and rare records to town on Saturday. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 1114jkrecords4
VINYL REVIVAL: Orange record fair organiser Patrick Coomey is bringing live music and rare records to town on Saturday. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 1114jkrecords4

There’ll be one for the money, two for the show, three to get ready and go, shop, go when the Orange Record, CD, vintage and collectable sale rocks into town on Saturday.

Thousands of albums and singles will be on sale at the free-entry fair at the CWA Hall in Robertson Park from 9am-5pm.

Five regional acts, including Smith & Jones, Doctor D and the Whitecoats, The Safety of Life at Sea, Corrugated Iron and Lynda Mainwaring will be performing live on stage throughout the day.

Organiser Patrick Coomey said he was reviving the in-store performances at independent record stores that were synonymous with collecting music around the 1960s and 1970s.

“It’s just like a local record store was,” he said.

“I’m expecting there will be thousands of records on sale.”

He said there would be stallholders from Sydney.

LIVE: Smith & Jones will perform live at the sale.

LIVE: Smith & Jones will perform live at the sale.

“It is really hard to buy music here in Orange,” he said.

Mr Coomey said record fairs were big business in Sydney with old favourites still the best sellers.

“Absolutely, Elvis [Presley] and The Beatles are the two consistents in record collecting, and some small independent releases of acts from the nineties, English acts, they can go for between $100 and $200,” he said.

“Things are going to start from $2.”

Mr Coomey said vinyl records were popular among collectors.

“Vinyl is an optimum form of music, it captures all the dynamics of recorded music very well,” he said. 

“A lot of people like that you are getting 12 inches of artwork. On your phone, all you get is a little screen snap.”

Mr Coomey said the live performances would add an extra element to the sale day and helped the local artists because they were not on the major record labels and could not sell their music in stores.

He hoped the record fair could be a regular event.

“Just like the food and wine, our music is something that can make great events,” he said.

“Jam Orange are very supportive. It could go further as a Jam Orange event.”