Families embrace cultural changes as they move from Asia to live in regional NSW

WELCOME: Orange residents Ade Saragih, Aravind Sankar, Subashini Aravind and daughter Jiya, 2. Photo: ANDREW MURRAY1010amfam11858

WELCOME: Orange residents Ade Saragih, Aravind Sankar, Subashini Aravind and daughter Jiya, 2. Photo: ANDREW MURRAY1010amfam11858

Aravind Sankar and his family left the humidity of southern India for sub-zero frost in Orange.

Ade Saragih left the hectic city of Jakarta for the outback space of Nyngan.

Welcome to cultural change in regional NSW 2017-style as people from across Asia move beyond Australia’s capital cities for a new life in regional NSW.

Mr Sankar, wife Subashini and daughter Jiya, 2, are part of a growing Indian community in Orange.

They said the community in Orange numbered about 250 people – with many working in health.

Mr Sankar is an accountant with the Department of Primary Industries while his wife, who wants to promote south Indian cuisine in Orange, is working at the La Porchetta Italian restaurant.

“I’m getting exposure with cooking Italian food, it will help preparing her [Jiya’s] lunchboxes for the future,” she laughed.

“We have two-three restaurants [in Orange] that are north Indian cuisine.

“There’s rice and butter chicken but there is more to India.”

Finding fresh Indian vegetables has proved hard for home cooking.

“We are cooking our traditional food with English vegetables.”

The family are enjoying Orange after spending about seven months in Sydney’s multicultural Cabramatta.

“It’s very beautiful, people are very friendly, you get to meet them easily,” she said.

Apart from food the other shock was the weather.

Swapping the humidity and 45 degree heat of Chennai for a frosty winter where the temperatures regularly dipped below zero in Orange has been a challenge.

Both Mrs Aravind and Mrs Saragih will be running food stalls at Saturday’s Orange Masala event at Northcourt from noon-4pm.

Mrs Saragih said when her husband got a mining job in Nyngan it was a shock after leaving busy Jakarta.

After five years they moved to Orange where they have lived for four years.

“The hardest thing is being separated from family,” she said.

“But Orange is a good place for my son to grow, not a big city but with many opportunities.”

She said there were about 10 Indonesian families in Orange and regularly got together with other Indonesians from western NSW, making a group of about 250.

Now she has started her own home business, Kedai Fi Fi, selling Indonesian food in Orange.