Yamato drummers to hit Bathurst

WITH heart-thumping rhythm and thunderous and explosive beats, the Yamato drummers of Japan will push their limits in a staggering display of physical strength and ferocious skills at the Bathurst Memorial Entertainment Centre next Thursday. 

SHOWTIME: Yamato drummer Gen Hidaka will be performing at the Bathurst Memorial Entertainment Centre on Thursday, September 21. Photo: SUPPLIED

SHOWTIME: Yamato drummer Gen Hidaka will be performing at the Bathurst Memorial Entertainment Centre on Thursday, September 21. Photo: SUPPLIED

In this high-energy performance, the unmistakable sound of the traditional Taiko drum, used in Shinto rituals, is challenged by Yamato as they use their entire bodies to produce their breathtaking beats.

Yamato drummer Gen Hidaka said he looking forward to creating a great show for the Bathurst audience.

“It’s the first time we have done a show in Australia,” he said.

“We hope to create a great energy for the audience.”

Mr Hidaka joined the Yamato drummers in 2006 and first saw the musicians perform in Switzerland.

We hope to create a great energy for the audience.

Yamato drummer Gen Hidaka

“I was a college student in Canada, doing business management. I had a friend from Switzerland and I went on a summer holiday there. During the period, he gave me tickets to the Yamato show for my birthday,” he said. 

“I didn’t know much and I was not interested. But I was impressed with what I saw. I was proud of myself for being Japanese and felt like I wanted to join them.” 

Being the first time Mr Hidaka has been to Australia, he has no idea what to expect but is keen to explore the cuisine, geography and people. 

“We’ll explore what we can do in Australia,” he said.

“We are looking forward to meeting as many people as possible, including in Bathurst.”

Mr Hidaka said while people might think the drumming is a traditional Japanese practice, it is not that.

“We use traditional Japanese instruments but we use modern techniques,” he said.

“We mix both tradition and modern to create a nnew music style.

“We’re looking for something energetic in the show.” 

Beginning with the boom of a Taiko drum made from a large 400 year-old tree, performers move their whole bodies to strike the drum with a powerful surge of energy that uplifts audiences in sync with the rhythm and intensity.

Tickets are still available for the show on September 21, with the cheapest tickets starting at $45.

Call the BMEC office 6333 6161 to secure your ticket for the 7.30pm show.