Now and then: Historic photos reveal our lost heritage and buildings | Map, photos

The bulldozers of progress have carved their way through many Orange landmarks as the city has evolved over the past 170 years.

Orange and District Historical Society member Ross Maroney has compiled a fascinating collection of historic photos of buildings that have been lost over time.

The Central Western Daily will be highlighting them over the next few weeks.

1 Orange Gasworks [now IGA supermarket]

Before electricity, gas lighting and gas power was needed for the city.

CLASSICAL GAS: Orange's gasworks building was once a notable landmark in the CBD. Photos: Orange and District Historical Society

CLASSICAL GAS: Orange's gasworks building was once a notable landmark in the CBD. Photos: Orange and District Historical Society

In 1876 a gas plant that had been used in Grafton was transferred to Orange and within a year many stores and pubs had replaced kerosene with gas.

The railway arrived in 1877 allowing coal to be brought to the site on the corner of Peisley and Byng Streets.

When electricity arrived in 1923 the works became redundant. 

The site was cleared in 1976 and redeveloped as a car park and IGA supermarket.

2 St Mary’s Catholic church [now Department of Primary Industries]

It’s hard to visualise it now with the huge DPI government office block on the site but the corner of Bathurst Road and Edward Street was home to  St. Mary’s church and school from 1926.

GATEWAY: St Mary's church and the school behind it was on the corner of Bathurst Road and Edward Street.

GATEWAY: St Mary's church and the school behind it was on the corner of Bathurst Road and Edward Street.

The school was located behind the church until they were demolished in 1989 to make way for the government offices.

A new St Marys church was built in Park Street.

3 Peisley Street shops [soon to be La Porchetta restaurant]

Captured in 1947 as a band marches past during the Cherry Blossom festival the streetscape in Peisley Street near Summer Street is long changed.

MARCHING ON: A band marches down Peisley Street from Summer Street passing a row of shops in 1947.

MARCHING ON: A band marches down Peisley Street from Summer Street passing a row of shops in 1947.

Verandahs and poles have given way to a car yard – although the former Roberts’ Bakery building will become a La Porchetta restaurant soon and has a retro look.

4 Kite Street houses [former CWD building, soon to be accommodation complex]

The above picture of Salvation Army solider Olive Griffin, opposite the Salvos’ church in Kite Street shows a row of cottages behind.

RETRO RIDE: Olive Griffin at the wheel of a unique car surrounded by children in Kite Street in the 1940s.

RETRO RIDE: Olive Griffin at the wheel of a unique car surrounded by children in Kite Street in the 1940s.

They were later demolished to make way for the Central Western Daily office.

Planning approval has been granted for Quest Apartments to demolish the building and construct an accommodation complex. 

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