Work on pipeline starts but questions remain over when water will be used

TAPPING IN: John Davis, Paul Toole, Scott Ferguson and David Somervaille announced the construction of the pipeline. Photo: MARK LOGAN

TAPPING IN: John Davis, Paul Toole, Scott Ferguson and David Somervaille announced the construction of the pipeline. Photo: MARK LOGAN

Work on a water pipeline stretching from the Carcoar water treatment plant to the Orange water treatment works is set to power ahead despite the rules establishing the use of the potable water not yet being finalised.

The project is receiving $21.21 million from the NSW government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, $5 million from Orange City Council and $2.5 million from Central Tablelands Water.

The 61-kilometre water pipeline, which will allow water to flow both ways and will pass through Spring Hill, Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar, will consist of steel pipes measuring 300-375 millimetres in diameter.

Decisions regarding when the pumps are to be switched on and the valves opened are yet to be made, said the Chair of Central Tablelands Water, David Somervaille.

“This is a stand-by or emergency pipeline, it’s not going to provide constant water to Orange from the Central Tablelands storage at Lake Rowlands, nor is it going to provide water to the Central Tablelands network from Suma Park in Orange,” he said.

“It’s designed to be available in an emergency so that the two water supply systems can be connected and effectively operated as one.”

The determination of what is an emergency is yet to decided.

“The cooperation that we are showing in the construction of the pipeline is about the engineering,” Mr Somervaille said.

“The actual governance on how it will be operated is yet to be decided.”

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