Letters to the Editor: Breaking the law? Don’t blame it on the cameras

DRIVERS' FAULT: "If speeding fines were $1,000, people would not be breaking the law so often. They would be watching their speed at all times" - Robert Smith.
DRIVERS' FAULT: "If speeding fines were $1,000, people would not be breaking the law so often. They would be watching their speed at all times" - Robert Smith.

Speed kills on highways and on streets. Speedometers are put on vehicles for a purpose: to keep a check on your speed.

Breaking speed limits on highways – no matter what the limits are set at – will cost the driver a fine if they are caught.

So what's all the hype about vehicles getting booked speeding on Woodward Street?

Doing over 50km/h is still breaking the law. If speeding fines were $1,000, people would not be breaking the law so often. They would be watching their speed at all times, and if it saves a life, all is well and good. 

As soon as people see the speed camera sign on Woodward Street they stomp on the breaks.

Two years ago I asked the speed camera man about how busy Woodward Street was getting. He told me that there was over 4,000 vehicles using the road every eight hours. That morning he said he had booked nine people for speeding in one hour.

Some mornings the speed camera is set up well before daylight and that's when he catches most of the speeding vehicles. Woodward Street is just like a drag strip some nights. 

A new roundabout is getting put on the corner of Moulder and Woodward streets very shortly.

I have lived on Woodward Street for 45 years. It's a noisy rat-race. Get used to speed cameras because everybody shall see them in different streets shortly. 

Robert Smith

SPEEDING’S JUST THE START ...

REGARDING the controversial speed camera ...

What is this all about? Surely residents in this area are no different to any other in that they would want to stop speeding drivers?

What does it matter where in a restricted speed area that a camera is located as long as it gets the message across that speed zones must be abided by?

And so what if it raises revenue? This is a good thing, as the money goes into government coffers and can be used as required.

Speeding drivers in Orange deserve and need to be booked as those of us who use the roads know, and not only for speeding, also for not abiding by the road rules.

There is no point locating a speed camera on a roundabout for instance, so locating one in a safe location that is apparently catching many offenders is a good idea as perhaps drivers caught will learn that speeding does not pay and they will not speed in any restricted area.

We could use some enforcement of traffic rules elsewhere around Orange, such as at roundabouts and failure to signal intention to name a couple, as generally the standard of driving in our city leaves a lot to be desired.

Yours sincerely,

Max Gregory

SEEKING THE CAMPBELLS

ON July 24, 1914, Colin Stewart Campbell, aged 27, died in Orange.

According to newspaper accounts Colin was well liked in the town and had established a successful bicycle business in Summer Street. Some time after his death, Colin’s wife Kate Evelyn and their only child Colin Archibald Campbell returned to Launceston.

I am a researcher/historian currently writing a book and would be most pleased to hear from anyone who may have any knowledge of them from 1911 onwards.

I can be contacted on 0362478839 or via email at derwin@netspace.net.au.

Darcy Erwin, Hobart