Safety warning: Children must be supervised in inflatable pools

Inflatable pool owners have been warned to supervise or empty their pools after six complaints about pools full of water being left unattended in public view in Orange in the past three weeks.

KEEPING COOL: Isla Taylor, 2, splashes in her inflatable pool in her backyard in Orange under parental supervision on Friday. Photo: DAVID FITZSIMONS

KEEPING COOL: Isla Taylor, 2, splashes in her inflatable pool in her backyard in Orange under parental supervision on Friday. Photo: DAVID FITZSIMONS

Orange City Council Deputy Mayor Jason Hamling said it only took a split second for a child to fall in and potentially drown.

He said inflatables were subject to the same pool fencing laws as permanent pools.

Inflatable pools capable of holding 30cm of water needed to be fenced.

“Council rangers have been called about pools being left in front yards and backyards,” he said.

“They have had to go to six residences in Orange and warn them about the implications of leaving pools unattended.

“State regulations say that if you have a pool, even the inflatable ones, you need to have a fence around it. But it’s pretty hard to enforce that.

“What we are saying is that if you aern’t using the pool you need to empty it straight away.

“Please don’t leave the pools unattended, watch your children at all times in water.

“It doesn’t matter how deep it is. It can happen very quickly, an accident or a tragedy.”

And he said pools left unattended in front yards could attract passers-by.

“If your neighbours or people walking down the street decide to come in by accident, especially young children, that accident can happen very quickly.

“It can only take a slip or a fall or just having a look and they are straight in head first and anything can happen.”

And Cr Hamling said that after an “absolute tragic summer” of drownings swimming lessons should be made compulsory in schools.

“I’m calling on the state government, and maybe big business and local government to have compulsory swimming lessons in schools,” he said.

“Not swimming lessons you can ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to, they should be compulsory.

“Basic swimming lessons, learning to float on your back and learning to get to the edge of the pool.”

He said the summer drownings were not confined to the ocean as there had been many incidents in backyard pools and inland waterways.

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