Python a long way from home: curator finds snake at Wade Park

SLIPPERY CUSTOMER: Bruce Cousins and Greg Pringle examine the woma python Mr Cousins found outside Wade Park on Monday. Photo: MATT FINDLAY                                                                           0812mfsnake

SLIPPERY CUSTOMER: Bruce Cousins and Greg Pringle examine the woma python Mr Cousins found outside Wade Park on Monday. Photo: MATT FINDLAY 0812mfsnake

YOU’VE heard of snakes on a plane, and snakes on a train, but prepare to be blown away by snakes in bananas.

Wade Park curator Bruce Cousins discovered a one metre-long woma python out the front of the ground on Monday, and snake catcher Greg Pringle said that particular breed of snake was not just rare for this area, it was virtually unheard of.

“The woma python is native to central Australia,” Mr Pringle explained.

“You hear about snakes being transported down in bunches of bananas every now and then to supermarkets, but that’s from north Queensland.

“Central Australia isn’t a produce area, so this sounds to me like it was someone’s pet that got loose.”

Mr Pringle explained the woma python was harmless to humans, but could be potentially deadly to small animals.

“They could eat a rabbit or a small cat easily,” he said.

“This has died from the cold, they aren’t used to these temperatures. I doubt the owner will come forward, I’d say more than likely they don’t have a licence.

“It sounds like irresponsibility or ignorance to me on the owner’s behalf. Even big snakes can escape from areas through very small holes.”

Despite the snake being dead when he discovered it, Mr Cousins said he got more than a surprise when he first saw the reptile.

“It was pretty alarming really,” he said.

“I’ve never found a snake at Wade at all, let alone one that looks like that.

“It certainly gave my mate a scare too when I put it somewhere he could find at smoko.”

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