What can you do when your neighbour turns their front yard into a dump?

EYESORE: The front yard of a Windred Street house will be inspected this week to determine if it’s an environmental health hazard. 
Photo: MEGAN FOSTER 0801houseMF5

EYESORE: The front yard of a Windred Street house will be inspected this week to determine if it’s an environmental health hazard. Photo: MEGAN FOSTER 0801houseMF5

WHEN an elderly woman decided to buy an investment property in Windred Street several years ago little did she know the value of her property would continue to dwindle as her messy neighbour turned her front yard into a rubbish tip.

“It’s very frustrating, it’s affected the value of my property and it’s impacted my rental return,” she said.

The woman, who asked not to be named, said she also believes the property is a fire hazard due to the large number of books and paper items stored there and in the past she’s had a tenant terminate their lease after seeing rodents in the yard.

“I regret buying there, it’s been a thorn in my side ever since I bought it,” she said.

The woman said she’s not the only one who is unhappy about the untidy yard.

“There are people in the street who have lived there for years and feel the same way I do, but I don’t know how you solve this problem,” she said.

“I’ve spoken to council staff and they’re as frustrated as I am.”

OUR SAY: COME CLEAN, FOR THE SAKE OF NEIGHBOURLY RELATIONSHIPS

For several years neighbours and Orange City Council staff have battled without success to get the owner of the two-storey suburban house to clear away rubbish.

Council spokesperson Nick Redmond said the property would be inspected this week to determine if it represented an environmental health hazard.

If it’s deemed to be a hazard, a clean-up would be ordered and the homeowner would be asked to pay for it.

“We haven’t had any recent complaints, council does keep an eye on it,” he said.

Mr Redmond said it was frustrating for council staff and neighbours to have to continually address the problem.

Council has already ordered three clean-ups, at a cost of around $2500 each, in the past nine years.

tracey.prisk@fairfaxmedia.com.au

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop