At 17 years old Glory the quarter horse knows the drill

OPEN WIDE: Glory, the 17-year-old quarter horse, gets a dental check-up and a little work from veterinary surgeon Andrew Litchfield assisted by equine nurse Emma Spicer. Photo: STEVE GOSCH           0728sgdental1

OPEN WIDE: Glory, the 17-year-old quarter horse, gets a dental check-up and a little work from veterinary surgeon Andrew Litchfield assisted by equine nurse Emma Spicer. Photo: STEVE GOSCH 0728sgdental1

WHEN the horse dentist came to visit 17-year-old quarter horse Glory at the home of Orange’s Riding for the Disabled on Monday he brought along some serious equipment.

Orange Veterinary Hospital surgeon Andrew Litchfield, assisted by equine nurse Emma Spicer, donated their services to the Riding for the Disabled yesterday as part of the Australian Veterinary Association’s pet dental health week.

According to Mr Litchfield, horses experience dental problems just as adults do, but they rely on an observant and diligent owner working with a vet to keep them pain free.

“You can usually tell if they have a problem with their teeth that’s worrying them,” Mr Litchfield said.

“If they shake their head when you put the bit on them or they start to dribble when they’re eating there’s usually a problem.”

Mr Litchfield complimented Glory on the condition of her teeth.

“She’s actually got quite a good mouth considering how old she is,” he said.

Mr Litchfield sedated the horse before filing back parts of her teeth.

“It’s the best way for her and it makes it a lot safer for us as well,” he said.

Orange Riding for the Disabled president Pat Frecklington said the organisation was grateful for the work Mr Litchfield carried out yesterday.

Mr Litchfield said advances in the treatment of horses with dental problems was improving all the time.

“We really have come a long way in the last 10 years,” he said.

janice.harris@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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