Troubled teen all smiles after avoiding detention for theft and escape on motorbike

LUCKY ESCAPE: A teenage boy charged with attempting to run a police officer down with a trail bike could not wipe the smile off his face when he was given a probation bond for 12 months instead of detention.

LUCKY ESCAPE: A teenage boy charged with attempting to run a police officer down with a trail bike could not wipe the smile off his face when he was given a probation bond for 12 months instead of detention.

A TEENAGE boy charged with attempting to run a police officer down with a trail bike could not wipe the smile off his face when he was given a probation bond for 12 months instead of detention. 

It was in stark contrast to his bail hearing when he swore violently, spat in the direction of the magistrate, Terry Lucas, and had to be detained by sheriffs and police when he was denied bail.

The 15-year-old appeared in Orange Local Court on Thursday via video link. 

On Thursday, March 20, the boy tried to escape from police on the bike because he had stolen Canterbury pants from a sports shop two days earlier. 

Police spotted him in Springfield Place riding the bike in a laneway that connected the street to Rosedale Place. 

Police facts said the boy told them he did not attempt to run down the male police officer, rather, he accelerated the bike to try and get past the officer, who stood in his way. 

The officer said he had nowhere to go so he braced himself for the impact and lowered his left shoulder towards the boy on the bike. 

The officer was treated at the scene by paramedics and taken to Orange Health Service.

He had grazes, bruising and was in pain. 

Police withdrew accusations he attempted to run down the officer, but he was convicted of shoplifting, destroying property, having stolen goods in custody, driving while not licensed, driving an unregistered and uninsured vehicle and not wearing a helmet.

The boy wore rosary beads around his neck during his sentencing.

Mr Lucas told the youth if he “played up” in the next 12 months then juvenile detention would become his home.

“Your world turns around from today,” he told the boy.

“Don’t let me down.”

Police facts said the boy could not read nor write and the only person to support him in Court on Thursday was a case worker. 

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