Slideshow marches to the beat: call for 100 years of Anzac Day march photos

MARCHING ON: World War I Centenary working party chair Reg Kidd and Central West Libraries manager Jan Richards have called for residents to contribute Anzac march photographs for next year's commemorations. Cr Kidd shows off a photo of Mayor McNeilley on Anzac Day in 1925.
Photo: Steve Gosch.0512sgwarpics2

MARCHING ON: World War I Centenary working party chair Reg Kidd and Central West Libraries manager Jan Richards have called for residents to contribute Anzac march photographs for next year's commemorations. Cr Kidd shows off a photo of Mayor McNeilley on Anzac Day in 1925. Photo: Steve Gosch.0512sgwarpics2

ORANGE’S Anzac march will be put to song next year, but Anzac centenary organisers need the community’s help.

The World War I Centenary working party is collecting photographs from Anzac marches throughout Orange’s history.

Chair Reg Kidd said there was room for 100 images and residents were encouraged to submit their snaps.

“One photo from each year would do it easily,” he said.

The pictures will be set to April the 25th, a song written by Neil Birdsall, who attended Orange High School with Cr Kidd.

Birdsall wrote the song about his uncle, Lloyd Birdsall, who served at Papua New Guinea during World War II as part of the 14th Field Regiment - and has taken part in the Anzac marches every year since.

“He’s 90 so he’s getting quieter, but he managed to get to the march this year,” Neil Birdsall said.

“The song describes the march, the children watching, the bugle being blown and the Ode.

“I played it for him and he said, ‘That’s pretty good, why not record it?’ - now it’s got a life of its own.”

Birdsall wrote the song several years ago and it has since received national airplay, including the Albany Dawn Service.

It has even received the nod from the Australian War Memorial and is regularly used in schools as part of Anzac curriculum.

“The best songs just come to you and I remember this came to me in half an hour,” he said.

“I’m absolutely thrilled, I’m really pleased it will be put to good use.”

Now living in Mortdale, Birdsall will not be able to attend the Anzac service in Orange next year, however said he would visit close to the date to be involved with the picture slideshow.

“I may be there with a guitar in hand, you never know,” he said.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop